Trump Foundation Is Sued By New York Attorney General Over “Misuse Of Charitable Assets”

The New York attorney general has asked a judge to close down the Trump Foundation, accusing the charity of fraudulent dealings and campaign funding violations. Mr. Trump is accused of using charity money to buy a $10,000 painting of himself, to hang at one of his golf clubs, and of resolving a row about Mar-a-Lago with a donation to charity, made with foundation funds. He is also accused of using a foundation fundraiser to drum up political support for his presidential campaign. US law forbids using a charity to support “private interests” or political campaigns. Barbara Underwood, the attorney general, submitted the documents before the state supreme court in Manhattan on Thursday, at the end of a two-year investigation into the charity.

New York sues Trump and his charity over ‘self-dealing’

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Ex-Fraternity Member At Penn State Is First To Plead Guilty In Hazing Death

A former Penn State fraternity brother has entered the first guilty plea in connection with the death of pledge Tim Piazza, who died after falling down fraternity house stairs during an alcohol-fueled hazing ritual, prosecutors said. Ryan Burke, who was accused of forcing Piazza to drink from a bottle of vodka the night of his fall, pleaded guilty Wednesday to four counts of hazing and five counts relating to unlawful acts involving liquor. Burke, now 21, admitted to his role in the hazing and will be sentenced on July 31, according to prosecutors.

Penn State ex-frat brother makes first guilty plea in hazing death of 19-year-old pledge

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Incumbent Rep. Mark Sanford Loses In South Carolina Primary

Rep. Mark Sanford, one of President Trump’s sharpest Republican critics in Congress, was ousted by a primary challenger on Tuesday after Trump waged a last-minute effort to defeat him. The South Carolina representative lost to state legislator Katie Arrington, who won Trump’s support just hours before the polls closed on Tuesday. Trump lashed out against Sanford, declaring him “nothing but trouble” in a tweet and referencing his 2009 extramarital affair. Sanford becomes just the second House Republican to lose in a primary this year. “Based on the numbers I see, I think I’ll end up losing this election,” a resigned Sanford told supporters Tuesday night. With nearly all the vote tallied, Arrington had slightly more than half the vote — enough to clinch the nomination and avoid a runoff.

Mark Sanford loses after late Trump tweet against him; 5 states hold primaries

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Gunman Kills 4 Child Hostages And Himself After Florida Standoff

After a standoff of more than 21 hours, officers entered an apartment where a felon with a gun had barricaded himself with four children and found them all dead, a police chief said. Orlando Police Chief John Mina said at a news conference just before midnight Monday that Gary Wayne Lindsey, 35, was found dead in a closet when officers entered the apartment around 9 p.m. The children with Lindsey ranged in age from 1 to 11. Two of them were Lindsey’s and two were his girlfriend’s, officers said. A police spokeswoman said Tuesday that the medical examiner, as part of an investigation, would determine when the children were killed.  Court records show Lindsey had an extensive criminal history involving arson, battery and theft. He was on probation for several charges including arson.

Gunman kills self, 4 child hostages after standoff with police in Florida

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FBI Agent Whose Gun Went Off While Dancing In Nightclub Taken Into Custody

An off-duty FBI agent who accidentally fired a gun that dropped out of its holster while he was doing a back-flip at a nightclub was booked into custody on Tuesday. Chase Bishop, 29, was being held in a detention center in downtown Denver. He faces charges for second-degree assault but he has not been formally charged. Denver police have said Bishop was dancing at a nightclub in the early hours of June 2 when the gun fell from his waistband holster and hit the floor. When he went to grab it, the gun went off and wounded a man who was taken to a hospital, where he was listed in good condition. Bishop is not assigned to the Denver office but works out of Washington, D.C.

FBI agent who accidentally fired gun while dancing turns himself in, could face assault charge

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U.S. Sanctions Russians Over Military And Intelligence Hacking

The U.S. Treasury imposed sanctions on three Russian individuals and five companies on Monday, saying they had worked with Moscow’s military and intelligence services on ways to conduct cyber attacks against the United States and its allies. The designation blocks all property of those targeted that is subject to U.S. jurisdiction and prohibits American citizens from engaging in transactions with them. In a statement, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said “The United States is engaged in an ongoing effort to counter malicious actors working at the behest of the Russian Federation and its military and intelligence units to increase Russia’s offensive cyber capabilities.”

U.S. hits five Russian firms with sanctions, citing cyberattacks

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Supreme Court Sides With Ohio’s Voter-Purge Law

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that Ohio’s law for removing voters from registration rolls does not violate federal laws to protect people who simply choose not to vote. In a 5-4 opinion that split the conservative and liberal justices ans written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.,  the court rejected arguments in a case from Ohio that the practice violates a federal law intended to increase the ranks of registered voters. A handful of other states also use voters’ inactivity to trigger a process that could lead to their removal from the voting rolls. Justice Alito said for the court that Ohio is complying with the 1993 National Voter Registration Act. He was joined by his four conservative colleagues. The four liberal justices dissented.

Supreme Court gives green light to Ohio’s voting roll purge

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Wildfire In Colorado Forces More Evacuations As It Doubles In Size

A growing wildfire in southwestern Colorado forced more people from their homes Sunday as crews tried to slow the blaze being fed by hot, dry and windy conditions. Authorities ordered the residents of 675 homes to evacuate after the fire burning north of Durango nearly doubled in size overnight, to 26 square miles. Residents of 2,156 homes have been ordered to evacuate as of Sunday afternoon. The cause of the blaze, which is being called the 416 Fire, which started in the San Juan National Forest, has not been determined.

Colorado wildfire doubles in size, thousands evacuated

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President Trump And Kim Jong Un Arrive in Singapore For Historic Summit Meeting

President Trump arrived in Singapore on Sunday for his historic on-again-off-again meeting with the North Korea leader, Kim Jong-un. The meeting will be the first ever between a sitting American president and a North Korean leader. Just over two weeks ago, it seemed that the summit meeting was not going to happen. But on Sunday, Mr. Trump arrived just after 8:20 p.m. local time at Paya Lebar Air Base in Singapore aboard Air Force One, a few hours after Mr. Kim landed at Changi Airport on a commercial Air China plane. 

WATCH: Trump arrives in Singapore for historic summit

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Facebook Accidentally Exposes 14 Million Users’ Private Posts

On Thursday, social media platform Facebook acknowledged that it accidentally exposed the private posts of 14 million users over the span of a few days last month. From May 18 through May 22, when Facebook was testing a new feature, any posts published by those 14 million users were automatically made public — even if the user’s privacy settings should have restricted who could see them. Facebook corrected the mistake, and by May 27, it changed back the affected posts. That means someone could have unwittingly shared a post publicly for as long as nine days. Starting Thursday, Facebook is letting the affected users know and asking them to review any posts they made during that time.

Facebook bug exposed private posts of up to 14 million users

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