Trump Orders New Tariffs With Exemptions For Mexico And Canada

On Thursday, President Donald Trump approved new steel and aluminum tariffs. Shortly before he signed proclamations imposing the tariffs, Trump said in the White House Roosevelt Room, flanked by steel and aluminum workers from Pennsylvania and Kentucky, that “Today, I’m defending America’s national security by placing tariffs on foreign imports of steel.  You don’t have steel, you don’t have a country.” The tariffs — 25 percent on imported steel and 10 percent on imported aluminum — will take effect March 23, a senior administration official told reporters.

Trump defies critics, makes steel and aluminum tariffs official


Editorial credit: Michael Candelori /

Mississippi Passes Law Banning Abortion After 15 Weeks

Mississippi lawmakers on Thursday passed what would be the nation’s most restrictive abortion law, making the procedure illegal in most cases after 15 weeks of pregnancy.  Lawmakers in the Republican-controlled Legislature hope the issue will eventually make its way to the U.S. Supreme Court.  The House voted 75-34 in favor of the measure, and Gov. Phil Bryant said again Thursday that he would sign it. The Senate passed the measure on Tuesday. There are two exceptions to House Bill 1510: if the fetus has a health problem that would prevent it from surviving outside the womb at full term, or if the pregnant woman’s life or a “major bodily function” is threatened by the pregnancy. Pregnancies as a result of rape and incest are not exempt.  The state’s only abortion provider pledged to sue, and the attorney general said he expected a tough legal battle ahead. “The Supreme Court has said and re-said again and again that states cannot prohibit women from obtaining abortions prior to viability, which is what a 15-week ban would do,” said Hillary Schneller, staff attorney for the national nonprofit Center for Reproductive Rights. The New York-based group, which advocates for free access to abortion, called the bill unconstitutional and “medically unsound.”

Mississippi House passes bill banning abortion after 15 weeks, sending measure to governor’s desk


Hope Hicks Told House Intelligence Committee Email Accounts Were Hacked

Former White House communications director Hope Hicks told the House Intelligence Committee last week that one of her email accounts was hacked, according to people who were present for her testimony in the panel’s Russia probe. According to sources who spoke on the condition of anonymity, Hicks indicated that she could no longer access two accounts: one that she used as a member of President Donald Trump’s campaign team, and a personal account. Hicks told lawmakers that one of the accounts was hacked, according to two sources who were in the room.  Hicks’ correspondence has been a subject of interest for Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is running a probe into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, as well as possible obstruction of justice by Trump associates.

Hicks told House intel committee she was hacked, sources say


Adult Film Star Stormy Daniels Sues President Trump

Adult film star Stormy Daniels sued President Donald Trump on Tuesday, alleging that he never signed a nondisclosure agreement that his lawyer had arranged with her.  The civil suit was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court and alleges that the agreement not to disclose Stephanie Clifford’s (known professionally as Stormy Daniels) “intimate” relationship with Trump is invalid because while both Clifford and Trump’s attorney Michael Cohen signed it, Trump never did.  Clifford and her attorney, Michael Avenatti, are asking the Los Angeles County Superior Court to declare that both the hush agreement and the side agreement “were never formed, and therefore do not exist, because, among other things, Mr. Trump never signed the agreements.” Avenatti said if the suit is a victory, it would allow his client to “tell her story.” “Ms. Clifford believes it’s important that the public learn the truth about what happened,” he said. “I think it’s time for her to tell her story and for the public to decide who is telling the truth.” The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Stormy Daniels Sues Trump & Her Lawyer Confirms Their Affair


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Washington First In Nation To Protect Net Neutrality

Washington became the first in the country to sign a bill specifically opposing the Federal Communications Commission’s rollback of net neutrality regulations. Net neutrality requires providers to treat all content in a similar fashion, without slowing down or speeding up users’ service. Washington’s bill prohibits companies that offer internet services from blocking legal content, applications, services or non-harmful devices. It also prevents providers from impairing internet traffic based on the content users are viewing. “Today we make history: Washington will be the first state in the nation to preserve the open internet,” Gov. Jay Inslee said. “We’ve seen the power of an open internet. It allows a student in Washington to connect with researchers all around the world — or a small business to compete in the global marketplace.” The law was approved by the state Legislature last month and will take effect on June 6.

Washington state passes law protecting net neutrality


White House Economic Adviser Gary Cohn To Step Down

The White House said on Tuesday that top White House economic adviser Gary Cohn, a Wall Street banker who became a key architect of the 2017 tax overhaul within the Trump administration, is resigning. “It has been an honor to serve my country and enact pro-growth economic policies to benefit the American people, in particular the passage of historic tax reform. I am grateful to the President for giving me this opportunity and wish him and the Administration great success in the future,” Cohn said in a statement issued by the White House. Cohn’s resignation came after U.S. President Donald Trump said he would impose hefty tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Trump’s pledge to impose tariffs prompted speculation Cohn might leave the White House because of his opposition to the policy. Cohn was the former president and chief operating officer of investment bank Goldman Sachs, and was hired by Mr. Trump after the 2016 presidential election.

White House economic adviser stepping down


Republican U.S. Senator Thad Cochran To Resign On April 1

Republican U.S. Senator Thad Cochran, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said on Monday he will resign on April 1st. The 80-year-old Cochran stayed home for a month last fall with urinary tract infections, returning to Washington in October to give Republicans the majority they needed to pass a budget plan. Cochran said in a statement, “I regret my health has become an ongoing challenge. I intend to fulfill my responsibilities and commitments to the people of Mississippi and the Senate through the completion of the 2018 appropriations cycle, after which I will formally retire from the U.S. Senate.”  Cochran was first elected to the Senate in 1978 after serving six years in the House.  Republican Gov. Phil Bryant will appoint a temporary replacement, and a special election will be held to fill the rest of the term through January 2021.

Longtime GOP senator announces resignation


Editorial credit: Katherine Welles /

Despite Mueller Subpoena, Former Trump Aide Sam Nunberg Says He Will Not Testify

Sam Nunberg, a former aide to Donald Trump, has been subpoenaed by special counsel Robert Mueller to appear before a grand jury, but he says he’s not planning to testify.  The subpoena also asks that Nunberg hand over communications between him and a number of members of the Trump campaign, including the president himself. Nunberg told The Washington Post he won’t provide that information either.  Mr. Nunberg worked for Mr. Trump from 2011 to 2015; however he was fired from the Trump campaign after Business Insider published a story about racially charged Facebook posts he had made.

Ex-aide won’t comply with subpoena, says Trump ‘may have done something’


Man Commits Suicide In Front Of The White House

The man who fatally shot himself in front of the White House has been identified as a 26-year-old from Maylene, Alabama. Officials say Cameron Ross Burgess removed a concealed handgun and began firing rounds in the vicinity of the North White House fence line just after 11:45 a.m. Saturday. Police do not believe any of those shots were being directed at the White House. President Donald Trump was in Florida during the shooting, but returned to Washington later in the day. No one else was injured.  After the incident the Secret Service released this statement, “The subject approached the vicinity of the North White House fence line and removed a concealed handgun and fired several rounds, none of which appear at this time to have been directed towards the White House.” The public was immediately alerted after the shots were fired and the White House was locked down.  

Man fires gun and commits suicide in front of the White House


Florida Senate Rejects Ban On Assault Weapons

The Florida Senate rejected a proposal to ban assault weapons, and voted for a measure to arm some teachers.  This comes after 17 people were killed in the deadliest high school shooting in U.S. history. An amendment that would have banned assault weapons attached to a wider bill failed on Saturday in a largely party-line vote, in response to the Feb. 14 killing of 14 students and three faculty at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in the Fort Lauderdale suburb of Parkland. The vote was 20-17 against the assault weapon ban, with two Republicans joining all of the senate’s 15 Democrats in support of the proposal.